The cervical cancer epidemic that screening has prevented in the UK

@article{Peto2004TheCC,
  title={The cervical cancer epidemic that screening has prevented in the UK},
  author={Julian Peto and Clare Gilham and Olivia Fletcher and Fiona E. Matthews},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2004},
  volume={364},
  pages={249-256}
}
BACKGROUND Recent reports suggest that the reduction in mortality achieved by the UK national cervical screening programme is too small to justify its financial and psychosocial costs, except perhaps in a few high-risk women. METHODS We analysed trends in mortality before 1988, when the British national screening programme was launched, to estimate what future trends in cervical cancer mortality would have been without any screening. FINDINGS Cervical cancer mortality in England and Wales… Expand
Recent trends in cervical cancer mortality in Britain and Ireland: the case for population-based cervical cancer screening
TLDR
The absence of population-based screening for cervical cancer in the Republic of Ireland is the most plausible explanation for differences in trend in cervical cancer mortality between 1970 and 2000. Expand
An epidemic averted through medical screening
  • H. Austin
  • Medicine
  • Journal of medical screening
  • 2005
TLDR
It is concluded that screening for cervical cancer has prevented an epidemic that otherwise would have resulted in one death in every 65 British women born since 1950 and the number of deaths in England and Wales would have reached about 3000 per year by the end of 2002. Expand
The impact of policy and screening on cervical cancer in England.
TLDR
The Cancer Reform Strategy has led the way for the Government's policy for cancer care, which needs to continue achieving the same positive outcomes, and has a positive impact both economically and socially. Expand
Cervical cancer incidence in young women: a historical and geographic controlled UK regional population study
TLDR
The incidence of cervical cancers in young women of the NE is increasing and the rise in incidence is unrelated to the change in screening policy in 2004, except for the incidence of chlamydia, herpes simplex and in particular, genital warts, which increased significantly in youngWomen. Expand
50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence
TLDR
According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries. Expand
Harms and benefits of screening to prevent cervical cancer
TLDR
Both their projection of a hypothetical cervical cancer epidemic without screening and their calculated costs per life saved are an unscientific exercise in screening advocacy, and Peto and co-workers assume that public health remains ignorant and impotent. Expand
Trends in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma Incidence in 13 European Countries: Changing Risk and the Effects of Screening
TLDR
Analysis of trends in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri in 13 European countries to evaluate effectiveness of screening against a background of changing risk found period- and cohort-specific declines in cervical SCC. Expand
Cervical cancer mortality in young adult European women.
TLDR
It is essential to introduce well-organised screening programmes for early detection of CC with coverage of a correspondingly high percentage of the population, particularly in East-Central Europe, as well as to introduce high-coverage HPV vaccination in all European countries. Expand
An evaluation of a social marketing campaign to reduce the number of London women who have never been screened for cervical cancer
TLDR
An evaluation of a social marketing campaign, which exploited a recent software development to identify and target London women aged 40–64 years who had never previously had a cervical smear test, which achieved considerable regional as well as local broadcast and print media coverage. Expand
Debates about cervical screening: an historical overview
  • L. Bryder
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
  • 2008
TLDR
Population-based cervical screening has been promoted widely and enthusiastically as a preventive measure for cervical cancer since the development of the Papanicolaou smear test in the 1940s but has been subject to intense criticism. Expand
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