The case against a regulated system of living kidney sales

@article{Jha2006TheCA,
  title={The case against a regulated system of living kidney sales},
  author={Vivekanand Jha and Kirpal S. Chugh},
  journal={Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology},
  year={2006},
  volume={2},
  pages={466-467}
}
  • V. Jha, K. Chugh
  • Published 1 September 2006
  • Medicine
  • Nature Clinical Practice Nephrology
Could the shortage of transplantable kidneys in the developed world be reduced by allowing willing individuals to sell their organs? To answer this question, the authors examine the outcomes of patients who have received paid kidneys, and the financial compensation and postoperative care received by their donors. Adoption of commercial kidney transplantation in the Western world would have inevitable knock-on effects in developing countries, they argue. 
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