The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and the endocannabinoid anandamide: possible antidepressant targets

@article{Bambico2008TheCC,
  title={The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and the endocannabinoid anandamide: possible antidepressant targets},
  author={Francis Rodriguez Bambico and Gabriella Gobbi},
  journal={Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets},
  year={2008},
  volume={12},
  pages={1347 - 1366}
}
  • F. Bambico, G. Gobbi
  • Published 14 October 2008
  • Medicine, Biology, Psychology
  • Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets
Background: Major depression has the highest rate of prevalence and incidence of morbidity among all mental disoders. The limited efficacies of current antidepressant treatments necessitate the development of alternative pharmacotherapies. Recent preclinical findings suggesting that cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and endocannabinoid enhancers possess antidepressant-like properties, and clinical evidence that the CB1 antagonist rimonabant increases the risk of depression and suicidality… 
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The prospects of using the psychoactive effects of cannabinoids in treating mental and psychiatric disorders are discussed, however, this evidence is weak for some clinical conditions and well-designed randomized controlled trials are currently lacking.
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TLDR
Evidence from animal and human studies has revealed that dysfunction in endocannabinoid signalling can produce depression-like behaviours; therefore, improvement of endoc cannabinoidoid signalling may represent a new therapeutic approach for the management of depressive disorders.
Exo- and Endo-cannabinoids in Depressive and Suicidal Behaviors
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The literature discussed here suggests that the endocannabinoid system may be a viable target for treatments of these neuropsychiatric conditions, including mood and addictive disorders.
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