The butterfly subfamily Pseudopontiinae is not monobasic: marked genetic diversity and morphology reveal three new species of Pseudopontia (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

@article{Mitter2011TheBS,
  title={The butterfly subfamily Pseudopontiinae is not monobasic: marked genetic diversity and morphology reveal three new species of Pseudopontia (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)},
  author={Kim T. Mitter and Torben Bjerregaard Larsen and Willy De Prins and Jurate De Prins and Steve Collins and Ga{\"e}l R Vande weghe and Szabolcs S{\'a}fi{\'a}n and Evgeny V. Zakharov and David J. Hawthorne and Akito Y. Kawahara and Jerome C. Regier},
  journal={Systematic Entomology},
  year={2011},
  volume={36}
}
The Afrotropical butterfly subfamily Pseudopontiinae (Pieridae) was traditionally thought to comprise one species, with two subspecies (Pseudopontia paradoxa paradoxa Felder & Felder and Pseudopontia paradoxa australis Dixey) differing in a single detail of a hindwing vein. The two subspecies also differ in their known geographic distributions (mainly north of versus south of the equator). Unlike most butterflies, Pseudopontia is white with no visible wing or body markings. We now report that… 
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