The burgeoning reach of animal culture

@article{Whiten2021TheBR,
  title={The burgeoning reach of animal culture},
  author={Andrew Whiten},
  journal={Science},
  year={2021},
  volume={372}
}
  • A. Whiten
  • Published 2 April 2021
  • Medicine
  • Science
We are not alone Before the mid-20th century, it was generally assumed that culture, behavior learned from others, was specific to humans. However, starting with identification in a few species, evidence that animals can learn and transmit behaviors has accumulated at an ever-increasing pace. Today, there is no doubt that culture is widespread among animal species, both vertebrates and invertebrates, marine and terrestrial. Whiten reviews evidence for animal culture and elaborates on the wide… Expand
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