The bony labyrinth of StW 573 ("Little Foot"): Implications for early hominin evolution and paleobiology.

@article{Beaudet2019TheBL,
  title={The bony labyrinth of StW 573 ("Little Foot"): Implications for early hominin evolution and paleobiology.},
  author={Am{\'e}lie Beaudet and Ronald J. Clarke and Laurent Bruxelles and Kristian J. Carlson and Robin H. Crompton and Frikkie de Beer and Jelle Dhaene and Jason L. Heaton and Kudakwashe Jakata and Tea Jashashvili and Kathleen Kuman and Juliet McClymont and Travis Rayne Pickering and Dominic Stratford},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2019},
  volume={127},
  pages={
          67-80
        }
}
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The Long Limb Bones of the StW 573 Australopithecus Skeleton from Sterkfontein Member 2: Descriptions and Proportions
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The evolution of the vestibular apparatus in apes and humans
TLDR
This work test and quantify the phylogenetic signal embedded in the vestibular morphology of extant anthropoids and two extinct apes and reconstructs the ancestral morphology of various hominoid clades based on phylogenetically-informed maximum likelihood methods.
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