The blind mind: No sensory visual imagery in aphantasia

@article{Keogh2018TheBM,
  title={The blind mind: No sensory visual imagery in aphantasia},
  author={Rebecca Keogh and Joel Pearson},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2018},
  volume={105},
  pages={53-60}
}
For most people the use of visual imagery is pervasive in daily life, but for a small group of people the experience of visual imagery is entirely unknown. Research based on subjective phenomenology indicates that otherwise healthy people can completely lack the experience of visual imagery, a condition now referred to as aphantasia. As congenital aphantasia has thus far been based on subjective reports, it remains unclear whether individuals are really unable to imagine visually, or if they… Expand
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