The blind leading the blind: Modeling chemically mediated army ant raid patterns

@article{Deneubourg2005TheBL,
  title={The blind leading the blind: Modeling chemically mediated army ant raid patterns},
  author={J. L. Deneubourg and Simon Goss and Nigel R. Franks and Jacques M. Pasteels},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={2},
  pages={719-725}
}
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