The biodynamics of arboreal locomotion: the effects of substrate diameter on locomotor kinetics in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica)

@article{Lammers2004TheBO,
  title={The biodynamics of arboreal locomotion: the effects of substrate diameter on locomotor kinetics in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica)},
  author={Andrew R. Lammers and Audrone R. Biknevicius},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={207},
  pages={4325 - 4336}
}
SUMMARY Effects of substrate diameter on locomotor biodynamics were studied in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Two horizontal substrates were used: a flat `terrestrial' trackway with a force platform integrated into the surface and a cylindrical `arboreal' trackway (20.3 mm diameter) with a force-transducer instrumented region. On both terrestrial and arboreal substrates, fore limbs exhibited higher vertical impulse and peak vertical force than hind limbs. Although… 
The effects of substrate texture on the mechanics of quadrupedal arboreal locomotion in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).
  • A. R. Lammers
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Journal of experimental zoology. Part A, Ecological genetics and physiology
  • 2009
TLDR
Stability on the rough trackway was probably maintained by relatively high momentum, but on the smooth trackway, the opossums used static methods to remain stable and avoid toppling, indicating that highly arboreal animals can remain dynamically stable on a wider variety of substrate textures.
Locomotor kinetics and kinematics on inclines and declines in the gray short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica
TLDR
Training gray short-tailed opossums to move along level, 30° inclined, and 30° declined trackways instrumented with a force platform revealed differences on the inclined and declined surfaces most likely result from the location of the opossum's center of mass, which is closer to the forelimbs than to the hindlimbs, and the greater functional range of the fore- vs- hindlimb function.
Biodynamics of climbing: effects of substrate orientation on the locomotion of a highly arboreal lizard (Chamaeleo calyptratus)
TLDR
It is found that forelimbs and hindlimbs contribute equally to the body's progression along inclines and declines, and the higher-positioned limb's vertical impulses decreased with slope, and although vertical impulses in the lower- positioned limb increased with substrate slope, peak vertical forces decreased.
Locomotor kinetics on sloped arboreal and terrestrial substrates in a small quadrupedal mammal.
The kinematic consequences of locomotion on sloped arboreal substrates in a generalized (Rattus norvegicus) and a specialized (Sciurus vulgaris) rodent
TLDR
The results revealed that rats and European red squirrels utilize comparable locomotor adjustments despite significant differences in travel speed and gait, and suggest that mammals that lack, or have reduced, grasping abilities try to maintain the locomotor mode used during horizontal branch locomotion on inclined branches for as long as possible.
Arboreal locomotion in rats – the challenge of maintaining stability
TLDR
Clawed mammals and primates share the reduction of vertical oscillations and side-to-side fluctuations, a crouched posture as well as the increase in lateral spine movements, which are behavioral adaptations caused by the biomechanical constraints of small branch locomotion, regardless of the way they make contact with the substrate.
Effects of perch diameter and incline on the kinematics, performance and modes of arboreal locomotion of corn snakes (Elaphe guttata)
TLDR
The numerous effects of perch diameter on kinematics and the similarity to tunnel concertina locomotion emphasize the importance of fit as a limitation in arboreal locomotion of snakes, however, the slower speeds on horizontal perches compared to tunnels also suggest that balance and grip may further limit locomotor performance.
Comparing the Arboreal Gaits of Muscardinus avellanarius and Glis glis (Gliridae, Rodentia): A First Quantitative Analysis
TLDR
It is suggested that the observed differences in gait metrics may be related to body size and to the utilization of different microhabitats, reducing potential interspecific competition.
Mechanics of generating friction during locomotion on rough and smooth arboreal trackways
  • A. R. Lammers
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2009
TLDR
It is predicted that arboreal specialists will show less change in performance between rough and smooth ar boreal trackways because of their greater ability to grasp or maintain contact with arborean substrates.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 49 REFERENCES
Locomotion of lizards on inclines and perches: hindlimb kinematics of an arboreal specialist and a terrestrial generalist
TLDR
The three-dimensional hindlimb kinematics of a specialized arboreal lizard, Chamaeleo calyptratus, moving horizontally, and up and down a 30° incline on a narrow (2.4 cm) perch and a flat surface is quantified.
The tale of the tail: limb function and locomotor mechanics in Alligator mississippiensis
TLDR
Analysis of ground reaction forces in the American alligator revealed the consequences of tail-dragging and how well Alligator was able to utilize mechanical energy-saving mechanisms (inverse pendulum or mass-spring).
Compliant walking in primates
TLDR
The use of a compliant walking gait appears to be extremely rare among mammals and is most likely related to an initial primate adaptation to quadrupedal locomotion on terminal branches, which represents a previously unrecognized dynamic postural mechanism for maintenance of similar bone stresses and safety factors in both arboreal and terrestrial environments.
Locomotion in Dromiciops-Australis (Marsupialia, Microbiotheriidae)
TLDR
Two of the symmetrical gaits used by Dromiciops are similar to those used by arboreal didelphids and phalangeroids and by most primates, but are rarely used by other mammals, suggesting that this species may utilise such substrata to a significant extent in nature.
Origins of primate locomotion: gait mechanics of the woolly opossum.
TLDR
The woolly opossum is the first nonprimate mammal to show locomotor mechanics that are identical to those of primates, which strongly implies that the earliest primates evolved gait specializations for fine-branch locomotion, which reflect important changes in forelimb function.
Forelimb mechanics as a function of substrate type during quadrupedalism in two anthropoid primates
TLDR
The quantitative data presented here support previous models for the evolution of primate locomotion that were based on theoretical biomechanics and qualitative or anecdotal evidence and reveal several previously undocumented accommodations to "arboreal" quadrupedal locomotion in these two primates.
Footfall patterns and interlimb co‐ordination in opossums (Family Didelphidae): evidence for the evolution of diagonal‐sequence walking gaits in primates
TLDR
The fact that the woolly opossum, a marsupial with primate-like feet that moves and forages mainly on thin branches, uses primarily diagonal-sequence gaits when walking supports the view that primate gaits evolved to meet the demands of locomotion on narrow supports.
The kinetics of primate quadrupedalism: "hindlimb drive" reconsidered
TLDR
The results support the overall conclusion of Kimura et al. (1979) that peak vertical forces are relatively low on the primate forelimb, but also show some variation most probably related to locomotor mode.
Kinematic parameters of terrestrial locomotion in cursorial (ratites), swimming (ducks), and striding birds (quail and guinea fowl).
  • A. Abourachid
  • Biology
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology
  • 2001
...
1
2
3
4
5
...