The binding of ketamine to plasma proteins: Emphasis on human plasma

@article{Dayton2004TheBO,
  title={The binding of ketamine to plasma proteins: Emphasis on human plasma},
  author={Peter G. Dayton and Richard L. Stiller and David R. Cook and James M. Perel},
  journal={European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  year={2004},
  volume={24},
  pages={825-831}
}
SummaryWe report for the first time that ketamine (K) is bound as much as 47% to human plasma. It was shown that binding of K to plasma and albumin is dependent on pH; binding is decreased at pH lower than 7.4 and increased at higher pH. This is in concordance with the pKa of K being 7.5; the partition coefficient between an organic phase and buffer was found to be sensitive to small pH changes. Binding of K is also influenced by albumin concentration and the affinity of K for human α1-acid… Expand
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