The avian nature of the brain and inner ear of Archaeopteryx

@article{Alonso2004TheAN,
  title={The avian nature of the brain and inner ear of Archaeopteryx},
  author={Patricio Dom{\'i}nguez Alonso and Angela C. Milner and Richard A. Ketcham and Mervyn John Cookson and Timothy Rowe},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={430},
  pages={666-669}
}
Archaeopteryx, the earliest known flying bird (avialan) from the Late Jurassic period, exhibits many shared primitive characters with more basal coelurosaurian dinosaurs (the clade including all theropods more bird-like than Allosaurus), such as teeth, a long bony tail and pinnate feathers. However, Archaeopteryx possessed asymmetrical flight feathers on its wings and tail, together with a wing feather arrangement shared with modern birds. This suggests some degree of powered flight capability… Expand
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