The autism‐epilepsy connection

@article{Levisohn2007TheAC,
  title={The autism‐epilepsy connection},
  author={Paul M. Levisohn},
  journal={Epilepsia},
  year={2007},
  volume={48}
}
  • P. Levisohn
  • Published 29 November 2007
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Epilepsia
Summary  The high prevalence of epilepsy in children with autism supports a neurobiologic etiology for autism. It remains unclear whether seizures and epileptiform activity on the EEG are causative or comorbid. It is also uncertain if focal epileptiform EEG abnormalities may be associated with stable cognitive impairment. Even less clear is whether these EEG abnormalities can result in the combination of language and social dysfunction seen in autistic spectrum disorders. 
Neurobiological basis of autism.
Transient Cognitive Impairment in Epilepsy
TLDR
The understanding of the influence of an abnormal EEG activity on brain computation in the context of the available clinical data and in genetic or pharmacological animal models is reviewed.
Linking autism and epilepsy
TLDR
A persistent, statistically significant link between autism and epilepsy, and smaller correlations with allergies and asthma are found, suggesting a possible secular increase in autism.
Epilepsy and autism: Is there a special relationship?
What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder
TLDR
An overview of the presentation, development, history, prevalence, and impact of ASD on the child and family is offered and research on the etiology of ASD is summarized.
Shared Etiology in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Epilepsy with Functional Disability
Autism spectrum disorders and epilepsies are heterogeneous human disorders that have miscellaneous etiologies and pathophysiology. There is considerable risk of frequent epilepsy in autism that
Comorbidity of childhood epilepsy.
Treatment of epilepsy in children with developmental disabilities.
Children with developmental disabilities are at increased risk for epilepsy with a prevalence rate higher than the general population. Some of the more common developmental disorders in childhood and
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