The attitude polarization phenomenon : role of response measure, attitude extremity, and behavioral consequences of reported attitude change

@article{Miller1993TheAP,
  title={The attitude polarization phenomenon : role of response measure, attitude extremity, and behavioral consequences of reported attitude change},
  author={Arthur George Miller and John W. McHoskey and Cynthia M. H. Bane and Timothy G. Dowd},
  journal={Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
  year={1993},
  volume={64},
  pages={561-574}
}
Four studies examined the generality of attitude polarization (C. G. Lord, L. Ross, & M. R. Lepper, 1979). Biased assimilation of essays on 2 controversial issues was substantial and correlated with reported attitude change. Polarization was observed for reported attitude change on capital punishment and generally stronger in Ss with extreme than moderate attitudes. Polarization was not indicated in a pre-post measurement design. For affirmative action, reported polarization was not observed… 

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