The artificial sweetener acesulfame potassium affects the gut microbiome and body weight gain in CD-1 mice

@article{Bian2017TheAS,
  title={The artificial sweetener acesulfame potassium affects the gut microbiome and body weight gain in CD-1 mice},
  author={Xiaoming Bian and L. Chi and Bei Gao and P. Tu and H. Ru and Kun Lu},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2017},
  volume={12}
}
Artificial sweeteners have been widely used in the modern diet, and their observed effects on human health have been inconsistent, with both beneficial and adverse outcomes reported. [...] Key Method In this study, we explored the effects of Ace-K on the gut microbiome and the changes in fecal metabolic profiles using 16S rRNA sequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics. We found that Ace-K consumption perturbed the gut microbiome of CD-1 mice after a 4-week treatment. The observed…Expand
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