The antioxidants in oils heated at frying temperature, whether natural or added, could protect against postprandial oxidative stress in obese people.

@article{PrezHerrera2013TheAI,
  title={The antioxidants in oils heated at frying temperature, whether natural or added, could protect against postprandial oxidative stress in obese people.},
  author={Aleyda P{\'e}rez-Herrera and Oriol Alberto Rangel-Z{\'u}{\~n}iga and Javier Delgado-Lista and Carmen Perezagua Mar{\'i}n and Pablo P{\'e}rez-Martinez and Inmaculada Tasset and Isaac T{\'u}nez and Gracia M. Quintana-Navarro and Fernando L{\'o}pez-Segura and Mar{\'i}a D Luque de Castro and Jose L{\'o}pez-Miranda and Antonio Camargo and Francisco Xavier P{\'e}rez-Jim{\'e}nez},
  journal={Food chemistry},
  year={2013},
  volume={138 4},
  pages={2250-9}
}
We have investigated the effects of the intake of oils heated at frying temperature in order to find an oil model for deep-frying that prevents postprandial oxidative stress. Twenty obese people received four breakfasts following a randomised crossover design consisting of different oils (virgin olive oil (VOO), sunflower oil (SFO), and a mixed seed oil (SFO/canola oil) with added dimethylpolysiloxane (SOX) or natural antioxidants from olives (SOP)), which were subjected to 20 heating cycles… CONTINUE READING