The animal nature of spontaneous human laughter

@article{Bryant2014TheAN,
  title={The animal nature of spontaneous human laughter},
  author={Gregory A. Bryant and C. Athena Aktipis and C. Athena Aktipis},
  journal={Evolution and Human Behavior},
  year={2014},
  volume={35},
  pages={327-335}
}
Abstract Laughter is a universally produced vocal signal that plays an important role in human social interaction. Researchers have distinguished between spontaneous and volitional laughter, but no empirical work has explored possible acoustic and perceptual differences. If spontaneous laughter is an honest signal of cooperative intent (e.g., derived from play breathing patterns), then the ability to mimic these sounds volitionally could have shaped perceptual systems to be attuned to aspects… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

The Perception of Spontaneous and Volitional Laughter Across 21 Societies
TLDR
High consistency across cultures in laughter judgments is demonstrated, underscoring the potential importance of nonverbal vocal communicative phenomena in human affiliation and cooperation. Expand
Impoverished encoding of speaker identity in spontaneous laughter
Abstract Our ability to perceive person identity from other human voices has been described as prodigious. However, emerging evidence points to limitations in this skill. In this study, weExpand
Laugh Like You Mean It: Authenticity Modulates Acoustic, Physiological and Perceptual Properties of Laughter
Abstract Several authors have recently presented evidence for perceptual and neural distinctions between genuine and acted expressions of emotion. Here, we describe how differences in authenticityExpand
Perception of group membership from spontaneous and volitional laughter
TLDR
It is demonstrated that both spontaneous and volitional laughter can be used by listeners to infer laughers’ cultural group identity, and that performance was equivalent for both types of laughter. Expand
Laughter as an approach to vocal evolution: The bipedal theory
  • R. Provine
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychonomic bulletin & review
  • 2017
TLDR
The evolution of bipedal locomotion freed the respiration system of its support function during running, permitting greater breath control and the selection for human-type laughter (a parsed exhalation), and subsequently the virtuosic, sustained, expiratory vocalization of speech. Expand
Speaker Sex Perception from Spontaneous and Volitional Nonverbal Vocalizations
TLDR
The higher the F0 of a vocal signal, the more likely listeners were to perceive a vocalization as being produced by a female speaker, an effect that was more pronounced for vocalizations produced by males. Expand
Laughter as a scientific problem: An adventure in sidewalk neuroscience
  • R. Provine
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Journal of comparative neurology
  • 2016
TLDR
Findings include the acoustic structure of laughter, the minimal voluntary control of laughed, contagiousness, the “punctuation effect” that describes the placement of laughter in conversation, the dominance of speech over laughed, the role of breath control in the evolution of speech, the evolutionary trajectory of laughed in primates, and the role in human matching and mating. Expand
Impaired generalization of speaker identity in the perception of familiar and unfamiliar voices.
TLDR
Performance was significantly impaired for spontaneous laughter and the detection of identity-related information fails to generalize across different types of nonverbal vocalizations, and potential underlying mechanisms and representations of familiar and unfamiliar voice perception are suggested. Expand
Emotional authenticity modulates affective and social trait inferences from voices
TLDR
It is found that the same acoustic features predicted perceived authenticity and trustworthiness in laughter: high pitch, spectral variability and less voicing, and for crying, associations between acoustic features and ratings were less reliable. Expand
Towards a social functional account of laughter: Acoustic features convey reward, affiliation, and dominance
TLDR
Laughter can signal much more that felt or faked amusement, as similar acoustic properties guided perceiver judgments of spontaneity and reward in the current framework. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 67 REFERENCES
The expressive pattern of laughter
Laughter as a vocal expressive-communicative signal is one of the least understood and most frequently overlooked human behaviors. The chapter provides an overview of what we know about laughter inExpand
Shared laughter in conversation as coalition signaling
Laughter in humans is likely homologous to play vocalizations in a variety of primate species, but its function in humans is poorly understood. During conversational interaction, people often laughExpand
Human laughter, social play, and play vocalizations of non-human primates: an evolutionary approach
It has been hypothesized that the evolutionary origin of human laughter lies in the facial play signals of non-human primates. Recent studies dealing with human laughter have stressed the importanceExpand
VARIATION OF SOUND PARAMETERS AFFECTS THE EVALUATION OF HUMAN LAUGHTER
Sounds of human laughter compose quite effectual stimuli that usually facilitate positive responses. We have studied the mechanisms of such effects and investigated how changes in particularExpand
It is not always tickling: Distinct cerebral responses during perception of different laughter types
TLDR
Functional MRI findings support the postulated diversification of human laughter in the course of evolution from an unequivocal play signal to laughter with distinct emotional contents subserving complex social functions. Expand
The acoustic features of human laughter.
TLDR
Recording of naturally produced laugh bouts recorded from 97 young adults as they watched funny video clips revealed evident diversity in production modes, remarkable variability in fundamental frequency characteristics, and consistent lack of articulation effects in supralaryngeal filtering are of particular interest. Expand
The Role of Rhythm and Pitch in the Evaluation of Human Laughter
Human laughter vocalizations are composed of highly variable sounds. We investigated the evaluation of laughter sounds and concentrated especially on the role of two acoustic features of laughterExpand
Laughter in Conversation: Features of Occurrence and Acoustic Structure
Although human laughter mainly occurs in social contexts, most studies have dealt with laughter evoked by media. In our study, we investigated conversational laughter. Our results show that laughterExpand
Laughter: A Stereotyped Human Vocalization
Laughter is a common, species-typical human vocal act and auditory signal that is important in social discourse. In this first quantitative description of laughter, we identified stereotyped featuresExpand
Not All Laughs are Alike: Voiced but Not Unvoiced Laughter Readily Elicits Positive Affect
TLDR
It is argued that laughers use the acoustic features of their vocalizations to shape listener affect, as voiced, songlike laughs were significantly more likely to elicit positive responses than were variants such as unvoiced grunts, pants, and snortlike sounds. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...