The animal cultures debate.

@article{Laland2006TheAC,
  title={The animal cultures debate.},
  author={Kevin N. Laland and Vincent M. Janik},
  journal={Trends in ecology \& evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={21 10},
  pages={
          542-7
        }
}
  • K. Laland, V. Janik
  • Published 1 October 2006
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Trends in ecology & evolution
Genetic and ‘cultural’ similarity in wild chimpanzees
TLDR
It is found that genetic dissimilarity cannot be eliminated as playing a major role in generating group differences in chimpanzee behaviour, and the overall levels of genetic and behavioural Dissimilarity between groups are highly and statistically significantly correlated.
Culture in non-human primates: definitions and evidence.
TLDR
It is argued for the necessity of field studies of wild primates in the comparative study of culture, providing examples of how such studies allow both the identification of cultures across non-human primate social groups and the mechanisms by which behaviours are transmitted both within and between groups.
A cultured debate
Animal behaviour The ecology of primate material culture
Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The ‘method of exclusion’ has, arguably, confirmed
Movement and conformity interact to establish local behavioural traditions in animal populations
TLDR
A strong interplay between movement and conformity is revealed in determining whether locally-variable traditions establish across a landscape or whether a single preference dominates the whole population.
Influence of social tolerance on social learning
One outstanding feature of modern human societies is the complex cultural behaviour they exhibit. Although we do not find comparable capacities for culture in other species, some elements of culture
The reach of gene–culture coevolution in animals
TLDR
The evidence suggests strongly that animal culture plays an important evolutionary role, and the growing body of evidence that culture is also a major driver of both neutral and adaptive genetic evolution in non-human animals is reviewed.
Movement and conformity interact to establish local behavioural traditions in animal populations
TLDR
A strong interplay between movement and conformity is revealed for determining whether local traditions establish across a landscape or whether a single preference dominates the whole population.
The knowns and unknowns of chimpanzee culture
Claims of culture in chimpanzees have appeared soon after the launch of the first field studies in Africa.1 The notion of chimpanzee ‘material cultures’ was coined,2 and this was followed by a first
Animal culture research should include avian nest construction
TLDR
A novel framework for (mechanistic, developmental, behavioural, and comparative) study on animal material culture: avian nest construction is presented.
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References

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The evolution of culture in animals
TLDR
John Bonner traces the origins of culture back to the early biological evolution of animals and provides examples of five categories of behavior leading to nonhuman culture: physical dexterity, relations with other species, auditory communication within a species, geographic locations, and inventions or innovations.
Understanding culture across species
Cultures in chimpanzees
TLDR
It is found that 39 different behaviour patterns, including tool usage, grooming and courtship behaviours, are customary or habitual in some communities but are absent in others where ecological explanations have been discounted.
Culture in whales and dolphins
TLDR
The complex and stable vocal and behavioural cultures of sympatric groups of killer whales (Orcinus orca) appear to have no parallel outside humans, and represent an independent evolution of cultural faculties.
The question of animal culture
  • B. Galef
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Human nature
  • 1992
TLDR
Whether traditional behaviors of animals, like traditions of humans, are transmitted by imitation learning is considered and it may be misleading to treat animal traditions and human culture as homologous (rather than analogous) and to refer to animal traditions as cultural.
Orangutan Cultures and the Evolution of Material Culture
TLDR
A correlation between geographic distance and cultural difference, a correlation between the abundance of opportunities for social learning and the size of the local cultural repertoire, and no effect of habitat on the content of culture mean that great-ape cultures exist and may have done so for at least 14 million years.
Do animals have culture?
TLDR
There is no reason to assume that cumulative culture depends critically on teaching, imitation, language, or perspective‐taking in animals, and currently, animals are being judged according to stricter criteria than humans.
The maintenance of vocal learning by gene–culture interaction: the cultural trap hypothesis
  • R. Lachlan, P. Slater
  • Psychology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1999
Vocal learning has evolved in several groups of animals, yet the reasons for its origins and maintenance are controversial, with none of the theories put forward appearing to apply over a broad range
The Human Adaptation for Culture
▪ Abstract Human beings are biologically adapted for culture in ways that other primates are not, as evidenced most clearly by the fact that only human cultural traditions accumulate modifications
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