The anatomy of aphasia revisited

@article{Kreisler2000TheAO,
  title={The anatomy of aphasia revisited},
  author={Alexandre Kreisler and Olivier Godefroy and Christine Delmaire and Brigitte Debachy and Michel Leclercq and Jean-Pierre Pruvo and David Leys},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2000},
  volume={54},
  pages={1117 - 1123}
}
Objective: To determine lesion locations associated with the various types of aphasic disorders in patients with stroke. Background: The anatomy of aphasia has been challenged by several recent studies. Discrepancies are likely to be due to methodologic issues. Methods: We examined 107 patients with a standardized aphasia battery and MRI. Three examiners blinded to the clinical data rated signal abnormalities in 69 predetermined regions of interest. The statistical procedure used classification… Expand
Lésions cérébrales focales et aphasie : présentations cliniques et évaluations
Focal cerebral lesions and aphasia: clinical presentations and assessments The assessment of episodes of aphasia has evolved in recent decades and has been enhanced by various theoreticalExpand
The dichotomous view on IFG lesion and non-fluent aphasia
TLDR
A large proportion of patients did not confirm the traditional prediction, namely that non-fluent patients’ lesions would include the inferior frontal gyrus and the opposite would be true for fluent patients, and the traditional lesion to syndrome correspondence seems to be oversimplified. Expand
A topographic study on the evaluation of speech and language in the acute phase of a first stroke.
TLDR
Language and cognitive tasks can help in the localization of acute stroke lesions and be developed as a test for neurologists in emergency settings. Expand
Predicting aphasia type from brain damage measured with structural MRI
TLDR
Overall, the results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas, consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasIA. Expand
Clinicoanatomical correlation in stroke related aphasia
TLDR
No absolute correlation exists between the lesion site and the type of clinical aphasia syndrome in majority of the patients with cortical and subcortical stroke. Expand
Neural substrates of subcortical aphasia in subacute stroke: Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping study
TLDR
Findings confirm language processing as one of the integrated sensory-motor processes that occur in the region around the left sylvian fissure in patients with stroke using VLSM and atlas-based analyses to explore the involvement of white matter tracts and subcortical structures. Expand
The unbridged gap between clinical diagnosis and contemporary research on aphasia: A short discussion on the validity and clinical utility of taxonomic categories
TLDR
The findings elucidate crucial vulnerabilities of the neo‐associationist classification, and further support a deficit‐rather than a syndrome‐based approach. Expand
Lesion characteristics related to treatment improvement in object and action naming for patients with chronic aphasia
TLDR
Large anterior cortical lesions and intactness of the basal ganglia may both contribute to more efficient reorganization of language functions. Expand
A Review of Conduction Aphasia
  • A. Ardila
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Current neurology and neuroscience reports
  • 2010
TLDR
It is concluded that conduction aphasia remains a controversial topic not only from the theoretic point of view, but also from the understanding of its neurologic foundations. Expand
Therapy of aphasia
TLDR
The assessment and treatment of aphasia is reviewed and the rationale for using dopaminergic and other drugs in conjunction with speech and language therapy in the treatment of this disorder is discussed. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 49 REFERENCES
To what extent can aphasic syndromes be localized?
TLDR
A retrospective study on 221 aphasic patients with one contiguous vascular lesion in the territory of the middle cerebral artery found no unequivocal association between type of aphasia and localization of lesion, and participation of basal ganglia and in particular of the head of the caudate nucleus in lesions producing aphasIA was not confirmed. Expand
Anatomoclinical correlations of the aphasias as defined through computerized tomography: Exceptions
We have studied the frequency of exceptions to classical aphasia localizations in right-handed, literate, adult, native speakers of Italian with focal vascular left-hemisphere lesions, correlatingExpand
Subcortical aphasia
TLDR
A corollary result of this study is that patients fluent during the early epoch are likely to have a better outcome, and those initially nonfluent have a poor prognosis for language recovery. Expand
Correlations of subcortical CT lesion sites and aphasia profiles.
TLDR
The aphasia profiles of 19 cases with subcortical infarction or haemorrhage showed several components of the aphasic syndromes, especially sentence length and grammatical form, ease of speech initiation, articulation, voice volume, and auditory comprehension were individually isolated for correlation with CT lesion site. Expand
Subcortical aphasia
TLDR
Similar aphasia profiles in patients with deep frontal and paraventricular white matter lesions suggest that damage to a frontal-caudate functional system underlies a "core" aphasian profile in these patients. Expand
The case of aphasia or neglect after striatocapsular infarction.
TLDR
Individual differences in recovery from aphasia after striatocapsular infarction can be explained in terms of the number of surviving cortical neurons. Expand
Conduction aphasia. A clinicopathological study.
TLDR
Three patients with conduction aphasia are described; in addition to the distinctive language disorder, two of them had severe ideomotor apraxia while the other was entirely free ofApraxia, and a review of the literature would propose the following. Expand
Neuropsychological changes related to unilateral lenticulostriate infarcts.
TLDR
The results strongly suggest that cortical involvement is critical to the extent and severity of neuropsychological changes in patients with lenticulostriate infarcts. Expand
Localization in transcortical sensory aphasia.
TLDR
The lesions shown on computed tomography and isotope scans of 15 patients who satisfied the objective criteria based on test scores were studied and showed a unique posterior parieto-occipital location of lesions. Expand
Anatomic basis of transcortical motor aphasia
Analysis of language profiles and CT anatomy in transcortical motor aphasia (TCMA) suggests that the essential lesion is disruption of connections at sites between the supplementary motor area andExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...