The allometry between secondary sexual traits and body size is nonlinear among cervids

@article{Lematre2014TheAB,
  title={The allometry between secondary sexual traits and body size is nonlinear among cervids},
  author={Jean-François Lema{\^i}tre and C{\'e}cile Vanp{\'e} and Floriane Plard and Jean-Michel Gaillard},
  journal={Biology Letters},
  year={2014},
  volume={10}
}
Allometric relationships between sexually selected traits and body size have been extensively studied in recent decades. While sexually selected traits generally display positive allometry, a few recent reports have suggested that allometric relationships are not always linear. In male cervids, having both long antlers and large size provides benefits in terms of increased mating success. However, such attributes are costly to grow and maintain, and these costs might constrain antler length… Expand
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