The age of the hominin fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and the origins of the Middle Stone Age

@article{Richter2017TheAO,
  title={The age of the hominin fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and the origins of the Middle Stone Age},
  author={Daniel Richter and Rainer Gr{\"u}n and Renaud Joannes-Boyau and Teresa E. Steele and Fethi Amani and Mathieu Ru{\'e} and Paul Fernandes and Jean‐Paul Raynal and Denis Geraads and Abdelouahed Ben-Ncer and Jean‐Jacques Hublin and Shannon P. McPherron},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={546},
  pages={293-296}
}
The timing and location of the emergence of our species and of associated behavioural changes are crucial for our understanding of human evolution. The earliest fossil attributed to a modern form of Homo sapiens comes from eastern Africa and is approximately 195 thousand years old, therefore the emergence of modern human biology is commonly placed at around 200 thousand years ago. The earliest Middle Stone Age assemblages come from eastern and southern Africa but date much earlier. Here we… 
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TLDR
A mosaic of features including facial, mandibular and dental morphology that aligns the Jebel Irhoud material with early or recent anatomically modern humans and more primitive neurocranial and endocranial morphology shows that the evolutionary processes behind the emergence of H. sapiens involved the whole African continent.
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TLDR
Jean-Jaques Hublin and colleagues report new human fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and identify numerous features, including a facial, mandibular and dental morphology, that align the material with early or recent modern humans that assign them to the earliest evolutionary phase of Homo sapiens.
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New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens.
TLDR
A mosaic of features including facial, mandibular and dental morphology that aligns the Jebel Irhoud material with early or recent anatomically modern humans and more primitive neurocranial and endocranial morphology shows that the evolutionary processes behind the emergence of H. sapiens involved the whole African continent.
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