The age of the Earth in the twentieth century: a problem (mostly) solved

@article{Dalrymple2001TheAO,
  title={The age of the Earth in the twentieth century: a problem (mostly) solved},
  author={G. Brent Dalrymple},
  journal={Geological Society, London, Special Publications},
  year={2001},
  volume={190},
  pages={205 - 221}
}
  • G. B. Dalrymple
  • Published 2001
  • Geology
  • Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Abstract In the early twentieth century the Earth’s age was unknown and scientific estimates, none of which were based on valid premises, varied typically from a few millions to billions of years. This important questions was answered only after more than half a century of innovation in both theory and instrumentation. Critical developments along this path included not only a better understanding of the fundamental properties of matter, but also: (a) the suggestion and first demonstration by… 

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