The adverse effects of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency during pregnancy and childhood: a review.

@article{Zimmermann2007TheAE,
  title={The adverse effects of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency during pregnancy and childhood: a review.},
  author={Michael B. Zimmermann},
  journal={Thyroid : official journal of the American Thyroid Association},
  year={2007},
  volume={17 9},
  pages={
          829-35
        }
}
  • M. Zimmermann
  • Published 23 October 2007
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Thyroid : official journal of the American Thyroid Association
Iodine is required for the production of thyroid hormones, which are essential for normal brain development, and the fetus, newborn, and young child are particularly vulnerable to iodine deficiency. The iodine requirement increases during pregnancy and recommended intakes are in the range of 220-250 microg/day. Monitoring iodine status during pregnancy is a challenge. New recommendations from World Health Organization suggest that a median urinary iodine concentration >250 microg/L and <500… 

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