The advantages of early spine fusion in the treatment of fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine.

@article{Forsyth1959TheAO,
  title={The advantages of early spine fusion in the treatment of fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine.},
  author={H F Forsyth and Eben Alexander and Charles M. Davis and R Underdal},
  journal={The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume},
  year={1959},
  volume={41-A 1},
  pages={
          17-36
        }
}
This Paper is concerned with the advantages of internal fixation and spine fusion early in the treatment of fracture-dislocations of the cervical spine. It is based on a statistical analysis of eighty-four cases of this entity treated within the clinical experience of the authors. It is important to understand the mechanism of injury in each case in order to treat it intelligently. In the treatment of cervical-spine injuries, first consideration must be given to protection of the neural… Expand
The place of closed manipulation in the management of flexion-rotation dislocations of the cervical spine.
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A policy of conservative management with gentle manipulation of the cervical spine in selected cases is advocated, reduction being maintained thereafter by skeletal traction. Expand
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  • Medicine
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of surgery
  • 1967
TLDR
A review of cases of fracture or dislocation of the cervical part of the spine at the Middlemore Hospital during the years 1947 to 1964 inclusive finds three groups—burst fractures, bilateral facet dislocations and extension injuries—are found to be associated with a relatively high incidence of cord damage. Expand
FRACTURE-DISLOCATIONS OF THE CERVICAL SPINE
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Open reduction and internal fixation of unilateral facet injuries gave better results and nonoperative treatment was more likely to result in cervical franslation on flexion/extension lateral radiographs, and in significant symptoms. Expand
Unilateral facet dislocations and fracture-dislocations of the cervical spine.
TLDR
Open reduction and internal fixation of unilateral facet injuries gave better results and nonoperative treatment was more likely to result in cervical translation on flexion/extension lateral radiographs, and in significant symptoms. Expand
Halo immobilization of cervical spine fractures. Indications and results.
TLDR
The halo has provided more effective and reliable immobilization than other orthoses and is an acceptable alternative to cervical fusion for the achievement of stability in a wide variety of cervical spine fractures and dislocations avoiding both the short-term and perhaps long-term complications of spinal fusion. Expand
Surgical Stabilization of the Cervical Spine After Trauma
TLDR
A comminuted burst ("teardrop") fracture produced by axial loading of the vertebral bodies should be stabilized by an anterior cortical strut graft for early mobilization and realignment of the spinal column to prevent progressive deformity. Expand
Severe injuries of the cervical spine treated by early anterior interbody fusion and ambulation.
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TLDR
The history and development of implant technologies that have led to techniques currently used to stabilize and fuse the spine are traced to create a better understanding of the clinical performance of these implants and of future developments. Expand
Stability following fracture-dislocations of the cervical spine
TLDR
It is concluded that conservative orthopaedic treatment leads to the best results in cases of fracture-dislocations of the cervical spine and that surgical fusion should be considered a routine procedure. Expand
Treatment of fractures and dislocations of the cervical spine, complicated by cervical-cord and root injuries. A comparative study of fusion vs. nonfusi on therapy.
  • D. Munro
  • Medicine
  • The New England journal of medicine
  • 1961
IN 1939 Wegner and I1 and again in 1943 I2 made the statement that "Every discussion of any level of any spinal cord injury should be based on two fundamental concepts. These are that spinal cordExpand
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References

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THE TREATMENT OF FRACTURE-DISLOCATIONS OF THE CERVICAL VERTEBRAE BY SKELETAL TRACTION AND FUSION
TLDR
From the experience, it is concluded that fusion is indicated when more than one of the bony structures are injured, but it is advisable in multiple fractures. Expand
The mechanism of injury to the spinal cord in the neck without damage to vertebral column.
  • A. Taylor
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume
  • 1951
TLDR
Experimental evidence suggests that cervical traumatic paraplegia may be caused by inward bulging of the ligamentum flavum during hyperextension, and the reasons why this inward bulge may occur, despite the elasticity of the tendon flavum, are discussed. Expand
Fractures and dislocations of the cervical spine; an end-result study.
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  • Medicine
  • The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
  • 1957
1 . For the dangerous period between the time of injury and definitive treatment, and while being moved about during definitive treatment, the patient should be recumbent, at all times, on a firmExpand
Paraplegia in hyperextension cervical injuries with normal radiographic appearances.
TLDR
The grave dangers of using the fully extended position of the cervical spine in the management of paraplegia with normal radiographic appearances in which cervical cord damage was shown at autopsy to have been due to hyperextension injury are noted. Expand
Paraplegia in cervical spine injuries.
  • G. Jefferson
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume
  • 1948
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