The accuracy of predictions

@article{Miller2004TheAO,
  title={The accuracy of predictions},
  author={David W. Miller},
  journal={Synthese},
  year={2004},
  volume={30},
  pages={159-191}
}
This paper, I am sorry to say, is deeply sceptical. It is also rather technical. And the scepticalities, I fear, are no easier to renounce than are the techni calities. The paper presents an elementary mathematical result that appears to impinge negatively on any reasonable theory of knowledge with empiricist pretensions. Moreover, it offers nothing positive as a sweetener. This is not because I would not like to endorse something constructive. It is because there is nothing constructive that I… Expand

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