The Y-chromosome C3* Star-Cluster Attributed to Genghis Khan's Descendants is Present at High Frequency in the Kerey Clan from Kazakhstan

@inproceedings{Abilev2012TheYC,
  title={The Y-chromosome C3* Star-Cluster Attributed to Genghis Khan's Descendants is Present at High Frequency in the Kerey Clan from Kazakhstan},
  author={Serikbai K. Abilev and Boris A. Malyarchuk and Miroslava Derenko and Marcin Woźniak and Tomasz Grzybowski and Ilya K. Zakharov},
  booktitle={Human biology},
  year={2012}
}
Abstract To verify the possibility that the Y-chromosome C3* star-cluster attributed to Genghis Khan and his patrilineal descendants is relatively frequent in the Kereys, who are the dominant clan in Kazakhstan and in Central Asia as a whole, polymorphism of the Y-chromosome was studied in Kazakhs, represented mostly by members of the Kerey clan. [] Key Result The Kereys showed the highest frequency (76.5%) of individuals carrying the Y-chromosome variant known as C3* star-cluster ascribed to the…
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