The Xenarthrans: Armadillos, Glyptodonts, Anteaters, and Sloths

@article{Defler2018TheXA,
  title={The Xenarthrans: Armadillos, Glyptodonts, Anteaters, and Sloths},
  author={Thomas R. Defler},
  journal={Topics in Geobiology},
  year={2018}
}
  • T. Defler
  • Published 2018
  • History
  • Topics in Geobiology
From the time that the first xenarthrans appeared as early armadillos in the Early Paleocene Itaborai, the group diversified into strange and wonderful forms. Besides the Dasypodidae, a group called the Glyptodontidae arose and diversified; some were the size (and shape) of a Volkswagen bug and were harmless grazers. They were very common on the grassy savannas of South America. Also, the sloth lineage appeared with the last species reaching the greatest size of any southern mammal. Megatherium… 

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