The X chromosome in population genetics

@article{Schaffner2004TheXC,
  title={The X chromosome in population genetics},
  author={Stephen F. Schaffner},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={43-51}
}
Genetic variation records a large amount of information about the history of a species and about the processes that create and shape that variation. Owing to the way in which it is inherited, the X chromosome is a rich resource of easily accessible genetic data, and therefore provides a unique tool for population-genetic studies. The potential of the human X chromosome, which rivals that of the more traditional mtDNA and Y chromosome, has only just begun to be tapped. 
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