The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms.

@article{Vardiman2002TheWH,
  title={The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms.},
  author={James W. Vardiman and Nancy Lee Harris and Richard Brunning},
  journal={Blood},
  year={2002},
  volume={100 7},
  pages={
          2292-302
        }
}
A World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms has recently been published. This classification was developed through the collaborative efforts of the Society for Hematopathology, the European Association of Hematopathologists, and more than 100 clinical hematologists and scientists who are internationally recognized for their expertise in hematopoietic neoplasms. For the lymphoid neoplasms, this classification provides a refinement of the entities… 

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