The Word for ‘One’ in Proto-Semitic

@article{WilsonWright2014TheWF,
  title={The Word for ‘One’ in Proto-Semitic},
  author={Aren M. Wilson-Wright},
  journal={Journal of Semitic Studies},
  year={2014},
  volume={59},
  pages={1-13}
}
Traditionally, scholars have reconstructed *waÌad or some variant thereof as the word for ‘one’ in Proto-Semitic. In this paper, I argue that *‘astis a better candidate because it is attested as a number in both East and West Semitic. *waÌad, by contrast, was most likely an adjective meaning ‘lone’ as in Akkadian. Along the way, I will review some methodological criteria that may prove useful in the ongoing effort to reconstruct Proto-Semitic. 1. A Different Scenario The treatment of the number… 

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