The Wick in the Candle of Learning

@article{Kang2009TheWI,
  title={The Wick in the Candle of Learning},
  author={Min Jeong Kang and Ming Hsu and Ian Krajbich and George Loewenstein and Samuel M. McClure and Joseph Tao-yi Wang and Colin Camerer},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={963 - 973}
}
Curiosity has been described as a desire for learning and knowledge, but its underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We scanned subjects with functional magnetic resonance imaging while they read trivia questions. The level of curiosity when reading questions was correlated with activity in caudate regions previously suggested to be involved in anticipated reward. This finding led to a behavioral study, which showed that subjects spent more scarce resources (either limited tokens or… Expand
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