The Wannsee Conference, the Fate of German Jews, and Hitler's Decision in Principle to Exterminate All European Jews*

@article{Gerlach1998TheWC,
  title={The Wannsee Conference, the Fate of German Jews, and Hitler's Decision in Principle to Exterminate All European Jews*},
  author={C. Gerlach},
  journal={The Journal of Modern History},
  year={1998},
  volume={70},
  pages={759 - 812}
}
  • C. Gerlach
  • Published 1998
  • Sociology
  • The Journal of Modern History
  • “The most remarkable thing about the meeting at Wannsee (which was not called the ‘Wannsee Conference’ until after the war) is that we do not know why it took place.” So wrote the celebrated German historian Eberhard Jackel in 1992. Many historians share this view. They find themselves somewhat puzzled with respect to the meeting at Wannsee. On the one hand, the historical significance of the event is largely uncontested. The minutes prepared by Adolf Eichmann constitute a document of central… CONTINUE READING
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    References

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