The Wages of Women in England, 1260–1850

@article{Humphries2015TheWO,
  title={The Wages of Women in England, 1260–1850},
  author={J. Humphries and Jacob Weisdorf},
  journal={The Journal of Economic History},
  year={2015},
  volume={75},
  pages={405 - 447}
}
This paper presents two wage-series for unskilled English women workers 1260–1850, one based on daily wages and one on the daily remuneration implied in annual contracts. The series are compared with each other and with evidence for men, informing several debates. Our findings suggest first that women servants did not share the post-Black Death “golden age” and so offer little support for a “girl-powered” economic breakthrough; and second that during the industrial revolution, women who were… Expand
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