The Visual Orientation Strategies of Mantis religiosa and Empusa fasciata Reflect Differences in the Structure of Their Visual Surroundings

@article{Kral2004TheVO,
  title={The Visual Orientation Strategies of Mantis religiosa and Empusa fasciata Reflect Differences in the Structure of Their Visual Surroundings},
  author={Karl Kral and Du{\vs}an Devetak},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2004},
  volume={12},
  pages={737-752}
}
In the present study, peering behaviour, which is used to measure distance by the image motion caused by head movement, is examined in two types of mantid. Mantis religiosa inhabits a region of dense grass consisting of uniform, generally uniformly aligned, and closely spaced elements and executes slow, simple peering movements. In contrast, Empusa fasciata climbs about in open regions of shrubs and bushes which consist of irregular, variably aligned and variably spaced elements and it executes… 

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