The Visual Light Curve Of C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) From Discovery To Late 1997

@article{Kidger1997TheVL,
  title={The Visual Light Curve Of C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) From Discovery To Late 1997},
  author={Mark Richard Kidger and G. M. Hurst and N. James},
  journal={Earth, Moon, and Planets},
  year={1997},
  volume={78},
  pages={169-177}
}
We present a light curve of C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) compiledfrom more than 3000 visual observations of the comet made by members of the The Astronomer Group world-wide. These observations cover the period from discovery through to the end of 1997. The light curve shows that the rate of brightening of the comet varied widely at different times, with rapid rates of brightening at high heliocentric distance pre-perhelion and a comparably rapid post-perihelion fade. There is no evidence that the… 
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