The Vaccine-Autism Connection: A Public Health Crisis Caused by Unethical Medical Practices and Fraudulent Science

@article{Flaherty2011TheVC,
  title={The Vaccine-Autism Connection: A Public Health Crisis Caused by Unethical Medical Practices and Fraudulent Science},
  author={Dennis K. Flaherty},
  journal={Annals of Pharmacotherapy},
  year={2011},
  volume={45},
  pages={1302 - 1304}
}
  • D. Flaherty
  • Published 1 October 2011
  • Medicine
  • Annals of Pharmacotherapy
In 1998. Dr. Andrew Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist, described a new autism phenotype called the regressive autism-enterocolitis syndrome triggered by environmental factors such as measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. The speculative vaccination-autism connection decreased parental confidence in public health vaccination programs and created a public health crisis in England and questions about vaccine safety in North America. After 10 years of controversy and investigation… 
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TLDR
The evidence now is convincing that the measles–mumps–rubella vaccine does not cause autism or any particular subtypes of autistic spectrum disorder.
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TLDR
Assessment of whether an association prevails between MMR vaccination and encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, and autism found no association and detected no clustering of hospitalizations for autism after vaccination.
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TLDR
A decreased risk of developing ASD with MMR compared to monovalent antigens is suggested, however, these findings may reflect potential selection bias due to requiring written consent, possible delayed vaccination in suspected autism cases, and small sample size.
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CONTEXT Considerable concern has been generated in the lay and medical communities by a theory that increased measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization among young children may be the cause of an
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TLDR
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