The Uses and Abuses of History: Genocide and the Making of the Karabakh Conflict

@article{Cheterian2018TheUA,
  title={The Uses and Abuses of History: Genocide and the Making of the Karabakh Conflict},
  author={Vicken Cheterian},
  journal={Europe-Asia Studies},
  year={2018},
  volume={70},
  pages={884 - 903}
}
Abstract Did the 1915 genocide of the Ottoman Armenians play a role in the genesis of the Karabakh war? In the early phase of the conflict, many Armenian activists and politicians drew parallels between the evolving struggles of the present and the traumatic events of 1915. This essay explores the ways in which Armenia, Azerbaijan and Turkey have referred to the events of 1915 to formulate their policies towards the conflict. The essay argues that the largely suppressed past trauma was present… 

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