The Use of Ice in the Treatment of Acute Soft-Tissue Injury

@article{Bleakley2004TheUO,
  title={The Use of Ice in the Treatment of Acute Soft-Tissue Injury},
  author={Chris M Bleakley and Suzanne McDonough and Domhnall C Macauley},
  journal={The American Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={32},
  pages={251 - 261}
}
Background There are wide variations in the clinical use of cryotherapy, and guidelines continue to be made on an empirical basis. Study Design Systematic review assessing the evidence base for cryotherapy in the treatment of acute soft-tissue injuries. Methods A computerized literature search, citation tracking, and hand searching were carried out up to April 2002. Eligible studies were randomized-controlled trials describing human subjects recovering from acute soft-tissue injuries and… Expand
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TLDR
There is insufficient evidence to suggest that cryotherapy improves clinical outcome in the management of soft tissue injuries. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Cryotherapy following total knee replacement.
TLDR
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[Evidence-based impact of cryotherapy on postoperative pain, swelling, drainage and tolerance after orthopedic surgery].
TLDR
The application of cold above 4 degrees C was considered comfortable by the patients, whereas reducing effects on swelling and drainage could not be found, and exact recommendations on application time and temperature can not be given. Expand
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  • Open access journal of sports medicine
  • 2010
TLDR
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TLDR
It is concluded that ice is effective, but should be applied in repeated application of 10 minutes to be most effective, avoid side effects, and prevent possible further injury. Expand
Ice therapy: how good is the evidence?
TLDR
It is concluded that ice is effective, but should be applied in repeated application of 10 minutes to be most effective, avoid side effects, and prevent possible further injury. Expand
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TLDR
The results from this study document the advantages of conitnous cold-compression therapy over cold alone following ACL reconstruction and compare the cold- Compression system with traditional ice therapy. Expand
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TLDR
The results indicate that the addition of cryotherapy to a regime of exercises following arthroscopic knee surgery produced benefits of increased compliance, improved weight-bearing status, and lower prescription medication consumption. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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It is concluded that the acute treatment of ankle sprains and muscle contusions in the Danish emergency rooms is not applied in accordance with consensus from international literature, and that the instruction in rehabilitation should be improved. Expand
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