The Use of Adolescent Nonhuman Primates to Model Human Alcohol Intake: Neurobiological, Genetic, and Psychological Variables

@article{Barr2004TheUO,
  title={The Use of Adolescent Nonhuman Primates to Model Human Alcohol Intake: Neurobiological, Genetic, and Psychological Variables},
  author={Christina S. Barr and Melanie L Schwandt and Timothy K. Newman and James Dee Higley},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={1021}
}
Abstract: Traits characteristic of type I and type II alcoholism are thought to relate to dysregulated central nervous system serotonin functioning. In this review, we discuss variables associated with high adolescent alcohol consumption and other risk‐taking behaviors in a nonhuman primate model. Adolescent primates with low CSF concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5‐HIAA are more impulsive and exhibit increased levels of alcohol consumption. Both genetic and environmental factors… 
Alcohol response and consumption in adolescent rhesus macaques: life history and genetic influences.
TLDR
This review discusses studies from the laboratory that have investigated both the initial response to acute alcohol administration and the consumption of alcohol in voluntary self-administration paradigms in adolescent rhesus macaques, and highlights several of the pathways involved in alcohol response and consumption, namely reward, behavioral dyscontrol, and vulnerability to stress.
Non-human primate models of alcohol-related phenotypes: the influence of genetic and environmental factors.
Because of their complex social structures, behaviors, and genetic similarities to humans, nonhuman primates are useful for studying how genetic factors influence alcohol consumption. The
REVIEW: Non‐human primate models of inheritance vulnerability to alcohol use disorders
TLDR
How non‐human primates can be particularly useful for studying how genetic variants interact with social factors, temperament and alcohol response as motivating factors for alcohol consumption and abstinence is discussed.
Adolescence and the Trajectory of Alcohol Use: Introduction to Part VI
  • L. Spear
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 2004
TLDR
Research in the area of adolescent alcohol use is progressing rapidly, as exemplified by the chapters in this section, with evidence that some neural changes may predate adolescent alcohol abuse, whereas others appear to be a consequence of this abuse.
A review of nonhuman primate models of early life stress and adolescent drug abuse
TLDR
This review examines NHP models of ELS that have been used to characterize its effects on sensitivity to drug reinforcement, and proposes future directions using NHP Models of E LS and drug abuse in an effort to develop more targeted intervention and prevention strategies for at risk clinical populations.
Transcription factor AP2 beta involved in severe female alcoholism
TLDR
Compared a sample of female alcoholics, sentenced to institutional care for their severe addiction, contrasted against a control sample of adolescent females, the results showed that parentalcohol misuse was significantly more common among the alcoholic females, and also that parental alcohol misuse was associated with a reduction in age of alcohol debut.
Neonatal temperament and neuromotor differences are predictive of adolescent alcohol intake in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)
TLDR
Evidence is provided that early‐life temperament and neurodevelopment may be important risk factors for adolescent AUDs and that the Infant Behavioral Assessment Scale may be used as an assessment tool for identifying such risk.
Effect of voluntary alcohol consumption on Maoa expression in the mesocorticolimbic brain of adult male rats previously exposed to prolonged maternal separation
TLDR
Maoa expression is sensitive to adulthood voluntary alcohol consumption in the presence of early life stress in outbred rats, and this findings add knowledge of the molecular basis of the previously reported associations between early life Stress, MAOA and susceptibility to alcohol misuse.
Early adversity and alcohol availability persistently modify serotonin and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal-axis metabolism and related behavior: What experimental research on rodents and primates can tell us
TLDR
Experimental evidence indicates that pathological adaptations of these systems are valuable predictors of human neuro-behavioral abnormalities like depression, impaired impulse control and alcohol abuse.
Trajectories of Alcohol Use and Electrophysiological and Morphological Indices of Brain Development: Distinguishing Causes from Consequences
  • S. Hill
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 2004
TLDR
Differences seen in amygdala volume between high‐ and low‐risk adolescents suggest that functional differences seen in electrophysiological responding or neuropsychological test performance may have anatomical correlates, and trajectories for information processing that can be reflected in P300 amplitude changes over time suggest that brain development provides a clue to why some individuals are more susceptible to becoming alcoholic.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 65 REFERENCES
Serotonin transporter gene variation is associated with alcohol sensitivity in rhesus macaques exposed to early-life stress.
TLDR
An effect of serotonin transporter gene variation on ethanol sensitivity is demonstrated, such that animals homozygous for the l allele exhibited decreased sensitivity to the ataxic and sedating effects of alcohol.
The utility of the non‐human primate model for studying gene by environment interactions in behavioral research
TLDR
Preliminary data presented here highlight the importance of considering gene‐environment interactions when studying childhood risk factors for aggression, anxiety and related neuropsychiatric disorders and support the use of the nonhuman primate for studing gene by environment interactions in behavioral research.
Interaction between serotonin transporter gene variation and rearing condition in alcohol preference and consumption in female primates.
TLDR
Interactions between rearing condition and serotonin transporter genotype are found, such that l/s peer-reared females demonstrated higher levels of ethanol preference and a potential interaction between serotonin transporter gene variation and early experience in vulnerability to alcoholism is suggested.
A nonhuman primate model of excessive alcohol intake. Personality and neurobiological parallels of type I- and type II-like alcoholism.
  • J. Higley, M. Linnoila
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism
  • 1997
TLDR
Investigation of mental, biochemical, and behavioral concomitants of voluntary excessive alcohol consumption in nonhuman primates showed that behavior patterns and biological indices that characterize high anxiety, whether constitutionally or stress induced, were correlated with high rates of alcohol consumption, consistent with predictions for type I alcoholism.
Nonhuman primate model of alcohol abuse: effects of early experience, personality, and stress on alcohol consumption.
TLDR
It is suggested that early rearing experiences that predispose monkeys to increased fear-related behaviors produce excessive alcohol consumption under normal living conditions, and a major challenge such as social separation increases alcohol consumption to levels producing intoxication even in monkeys not particularly vulnerable to stress.
Serotonin transporter gene variants in alcohol-dependent subjects with dissocial personality disorder
TLDR
The authors' tentative association findings in dissocial alcoholics suggest that the S allele of the 5' regulatory SLC6A4 polymorphism confers susceptibility to a temperamental profile of high novelty seeking and low harm avoidance that has been postulated to underlie dissocial (type-2) alcoholism according to Cloninger's neurogenetic theory of personality.
Neurogenetic adaptive mechanisms in alcoholism.
TLDR
Three dimensions of personality have been described that may reflect individual differences in brain systems modulating the activation, maintenance, and inhibition of behavioral responses to the effects of alcohol and other environmental stimuli that distinguish alcoholics with different patterns of behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuropharmacological responses to alcohol.
Association between low activity serotonin transporter promoter genotype and early onset alcoholism with habitual impulsive violent behavior
TLDR
The results suggest that the 5-HTT ‘S’ promoter polymorphism is associated with an increased risk for early onset alcoholism associated with antisocial personality disorder and impulsive, habitually violent behavior.
Low Central Nervous System Serotonergic Activity Is Traitlike and Correlates with Impulsive Behavior
TLDR
These studies show that inter individual differences in CNS serotonin turnover rate exhibit traitlike qualities and are stable across time and settings, with interindividual differences in CSF 5‐HIAA concentrations showing positive correlations across repeated sampling.
Childhood exposure to alcohol and adolescent drinking patterns.
TLDR
It is concluded that young people reared in home environments that have permissive attitudes to alcohol use and who are introduced to alcohol at an earlier age may be more vulnerable to alcohol-related problems in adolescence.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...