The Upper Limb of Australopithecus sediba

@article{Churchill2013TheUL,
  title={The Upper Limb of Australopithecus sediba},
  author={Steven Emilio Churchill and Trenton W. Holliday and Kristian J. Carlson and Tea Jashashvili and Marisa E. Macias and Sandra Mathews and Tawnee L. Sparling and P. Lennart Schmid and Darryl J. de Ruiter and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={340}
}
The evolution of the human upper limb involved a change in function from its use for both locomotion and prehension (as in apes) to a predominantly prehensile and manipulative role. Well-preserved forelimb remains of 1.98-million-year-old Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa, contribute to our understanding of this evolutionary transition. Whereas other aspects of their postcranial anatomy evince mosaic combinations of primitive (australopith-like) and derived (Homo-like) features… 
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