The Universal Ancestor and the Ancestor of Bacteria Were Hyperthermophiles

@article{Giulio2003TheU,
  title={
The Universal Ancestor and the Ancestor of Bacteria Were Hyperthermophiles
},
  author={Massimo Di Giulio},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2003},
  volume={57},
  pages={721-730}
}
  • M. Giulio
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Biology
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
The definition of the node of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) is justified in a topology of the unrooted universal tree. This definition allows previous analyses based on paralogous proteins to be extended to orthologous ones. In particular, the use of a thermophily index (based on the amino acids’ propensity to enter the [hyper] thermophile proteins more frequently) and its correlation with the optimal growth temperature of the various organisms allow inferences to be made on the… 

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