The United Nations Security Council and the Rally ’Round the Flag Effect

@article{Chapman2004TheUN,
  title={The United Nations Security Council and the Rally ’Round the Flag Effect},
  author={Terrence L. Chapman and Dan Reiter},
  journal={Journal of Conflict Resolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={48},
  pages={886 - 909}
}
A principal agent model is used to test the hypothesis that when proposed uses of force attract the support of the United Nations (UN) Security Council, the rally in support of the American president increases significantly. Regression analysis is applied to rallies during all militarized interstate disputes from 1945 to 2001. Results show that UN Security Council support significantly increases the rally behind the president (by as many as 9 points in presidential approval), even after… 

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