The UK National DNA Database. Balancing crime detection, human rights and privacy.

@article{Wallace2006TheUN,
  title={The UK National DNA Database. Balancing crime detection, human rights and privacy.},
  author={Helen Wallace},
  journal={EMBO reports},
  year={2006},
  volume={7 Spec No},
  pages={
          S26-30
        }
}
In 1994, the UK created the legal basis for a national DNA database of people who have been convicted of all but the most trivial offences. Since its creation one year later, the National DNA Database (NDNAD) has grown to include DNA samples from 2.7 million individuals—about 5.2% of the UK population (Home Office, 2006)—many of whom have never been charged with, or convicted of, any offence. It is the oldest, largest and most inclusive national forensic DNA database in the world. Under current… CONTINUE READING
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