The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the scientific concept of racial nervous resistance.

@article{Crenner2012TheTS,
  title={The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the scientific concept of racial nervous resistance.},
  author={Christopher Crenner},
  journal={Journal of the history of medicine and allied sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={67 2},
  pages={
          244-80
        }
}
In 1932, the U.S. Public Health Service began a study of untreated syphilis among black men in Macon County, Alabama. This project, later known as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, became one of the most notorious ventures of twentieth-century medicine. Much has been written on it. Historians have suggested that scientific racism strongly influenced the study. But specific links between earlier racial science and the scientific conduct of the study have remained unexplored. The examination in this… CONTINUE READING
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Race , Racism , and Antiracism : UNESCO and the Politics of Presenting Science to the Postwar Public

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