The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the Scientific Concept of Racial Nervous Resistance

@article{Crenner2012TheTS,
  title={The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the Scientific Concept of Racial Nervous Resistance},
  author={Christopher Crenner},
  journal={Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={67},
  pages={244 - 280}
}
  • C. Crenner
  • Published 2012
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
In 1932, the U.S. Public Health Service began a study of untreated syphilis among black men in Macon County, Alabama. This project, later known as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, became one of the most notorious ventures of twentieth-century medicine. Much has been written on it. Historians have suggested that scientific racism strongly influenced the study. But specific links between earlier racial science and the scientific conduct of the study have remained unexplored. The examination in this… Expand
The Role of the United States Public Health Service in the Control of Syphilis during the Early 20th Century
TLDR
The control of syphilis was not possible until the U.S. Public Health Service had the tools to define, recognize and treat this disease which became reality in the early twentieth century. Expand
Between Colonial, National, and International Medicine: The Case of Bejel
  • Liat Kozma
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Bulletin of the history of medicine
  • 2017
TLDR
Examining the postwar life of bejel, it is questioned how colonial legacies affected postcolonial and international medical theories and practices, on both national and international levels. Expand
Folk Religion and the Medical Engineering of Rural Black Laborers
In the study of American religion, scholars use the category folk to illuminate the religious worlds of populations on the margins of society. The category has been deployed to valorize the uniqueExpand
A Comparative Approach to Racial Stereotyping in South Africa and the United States and How It Has Obliterated the Black Image
A COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO RACIAL STEREOTYPING IN SOUTH AFRICA AND THE UNITED STATES AND HOW IT HAS OBLITERATED THE BLACK IMAGE Maylat Tedla Eyob Old Dominion University, 2020 Director: ProfessorExpand
Colorblind Racial Ideology and Physician Use of Race in Medical Decision-Making
TLDR
Physicians who adhere to a color blind racial ideology, particularly those who deny institutional racism, are more likely to use race in medical decision-making. Expand
“Deep-seated Abnormality”: Military Psychiatry, Segregation, and Discourses of Black “Unfitness” in World War II
This article examines the construction of “unfit” black masculinity in institutional and medical discourses of the American military during World War II. Examining the military medical literature onExpand
Moving forward: breaking the cycle of mistrust between American Indians and researchers.
TLDR
The Center for American Indian Community Health (CAICH) has launched a series of efforts to inform AIs about research participants' rights, and is empowering AIs to assert their rights as research participants. Expand
HIV practitioners in Madrid and New York improving inclusion of underrepresented populations in research.
TLDR
Though Madrid practitioners reported stronger agreement with ethical research practices, NYC practitioners were more involved in recruiting, interviewing and facilitating interventions, and practitioners can be trained to improve attitudes toward ethical practices and increase inclusion of underrepresented populations in research. Expand
Ethical and Legal Considerations in Human Biobanking: Experience of the Infectious Diseases BioBank at King’s College London, UK
TLDR
These advantages of biobanks were recognized by Time magazine as ‘one of the ten ideas that are changing the world right now’ (Park, 2009). Expand
Human tissue biobanks: the balance between consent and the common good
TLDR
It is suggested that to avoid biobanks evolving into ethnically biased archives which unwittingly promote race-specific research, research ethics committees engaging in a re-assessment of the relative merits of individual personal sovereignty and the common good is necessary. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 79 REFERENCES
The Scientific Environment of the Tuskegee Study of Syphilis, 1920-1960
TLDR
The present review seeks to place the Tuskegee Study, which was conducted from 1933 to 1972 by the Public Health Service (PHS), into its historical perspective with appreciation of the perception that developed, beginning in the 1910s into the 1930s, that syphilis was a major public health problem in the United States. Expand
Racism and Research: The Case of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study
TLDR
In 1932 the U.S. Public Health Service initiated an experiment in Macon County, Alabama, to determine the natural course of untreated, latent syphilis in black males, but when penicillin became widely available by the early 1950s as the preferred treatment for syphilis, the men did not receive therapy. Expand
Unraveling the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis.
  • R. White
  • Medicine
  • Archives of internal medicine
  • 2000
TLDR
A historically correct, empirically based analysis of the TSUS is presented in this article and will emphasize the historical perspective with respect to the standards of medical practice and public health at the beginning and during the first 20 years of the study. Expand
Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and Its Legacy
The forty-year Tuskegee Syphilis Study, which took place in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, from the 1930s through the 1970s, has become a profound metaphor for medical racism, government malfeasance,Expand
Eugenics, Medical Education, and the Public Health Service: Another Perspective on the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment
TLDR
Examination of the educational and professional linkages shared by three key physicians who launched and directed the Public Health Service Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Male Negro finds another explanation for its initiation is developed. Expand
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SYPHILIS IN COLORED AND IN WHITE WOMEN WITH MENTAL DISORDER
TLDR
A study was made of syphilis in a large group of female colored patients in St. Elizabeth's Hospital (Government Hospital for the Insane) Washington, D. C. Expand
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SYPHILIS IN WHITES AND IN NEGROES
TLDR
In conclusion, inheritance probably explains in part certain differences in tissue reactions in syphilitic infection, such as the early development of allergy in syphilis maligna, and the apparent absence of such a process in Syphilis secondaria tarda. Expand
SOME PHASES OF EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE QUESTION OF STRAINS
TLDR
The end for which the end is the determination in the rabbit of the various characteristics and peculiarities of the initial lesion and subsequent course of the disease, with strains of syphilis known to have produced nervous syphilis in the human being, compared with other strains known to run a mild course. Expand
SYPHILIS AMONG INSANE NEGROES.
  • S. Hindman
  • Medicine
  • American journal of public health
  • 1915
TLDR
The importance of gathering accurate mortality and nmorbidity statistics in the South should be over-estimated, especially if the authors expect to study intelligently the diseases Imiost prevalent in the negro. Expand
"Suitable Care of the African When Afflicted With Insanity": Race, Madness, and Social Order in Comparative Perspective
  • M. Summers
  • Medicine
  • Bulletin of the history of medicine
  • 2010
TLDR
It is argued that in order to fully comprehend the role of race in the history of the asylum in the United States, historians need to familiarize themselves with the history and historiography of colonial psychiatry. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...