The Trojan hives: pollinator pathogens, imported and distributed in bumblebee colonies

@article{Graystock2013TheTH,
  title={The Trojan hives: pollinator pathogens, imported and distributed in bumblebee colonies},
  author={P. Graystock and K. Yates and S. Evison and B. Darvill and D. Goulson and W. Hughes},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2013},
  volume={50},
  pages={1207-1215}
}
Summary 1. Over a million commercially produced bumblebee colonies are imported annually on a global scale for the pollination of greenhouse crops. After importation, they interact with other pollinators, with an associated risk of any parasites they carry infecting and harming native bees. National and supranational regulations are designed to prevent this, and commercially produced bumblebee colonies are accordingly now often sold and imported as being parasite-free. 2. Here, we used… Expand

Figures from this paper

Hygienic food to reduce pathogen risk to bumblebees.
Emerging dangers: deadly effects of an emergent parasite in a new pollinator host.
The relationship between managed bees and the prevalence of parasites in bumblebees
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 37 REFERENCES
Emerging dangers: deadly effects of an emergent parasite in a new pollinator host.
Pervasiveness of Parasites in Pollinators
Bumblebee commercialization will cause worldwide migration of parasitic mites
Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines.
Does Pathogen Spillover from Commercially Reared Bumble Bees Threaten Wild Pollinators?
Pathogen prevalence in commercially reared bumble bees and evidence of spillover in conspecific populations
Alien parasite hitchhikes to Patagonia on invasive bumblebee
...
1
2
3
4
...