The Three Systems: a Conceptual Way of Understanding Nocturnal Enuresis

@article{Butler2000TheTS,
  title={The Three Systems: a Conceptual Way of Understanding Nocturnal Enuresis},
  author={Richard J. Butler and Philip Holland},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology},
  year={2000},
  volume={34},
  pages={270 - 277}
}
  • R. Butler, P. Holland
  • Published 1 January 2000
  • Medicine
  • Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
Childhood nocturnal enuresis has traditionally been regarded as a multifaceted problem with a variety of treatment interventions. This paper proposes a model based on the notion that nocturnal enuresis arises through the ill functioning of one or more of the following three systems - a lack of vasopressin release during sleep; bladder instability; and/or an inability to arouse from sleep to bladder sensations. Clinical signs of each system are outlined and the appropriate treatment intervention… 
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