The Thalamus and Brainstem Act As Key Hubs in Alterations of Human Brain Network Connectivity Induced by Mild Propofol Sedation

@article{Gili2013TheTA,
  title={The Thalamus and Brainstem Act As Key Hubs in Alterations of Human Brain Network Connectivity Induced by Mild Propofol Sedation},
  author={T. Gili and N. Saxena and A. Diukova and K. Murphy and Judith E. Hall and R. Wise},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2013},
  volume={33},
  pages={4024 - 4031}
}
Despite their routine use during surgical procedures, no consensus has yet been reached on the precise mechanisms by which hypnotic anesthetic agents produce their effects. Molecular, animal and human studies have suggested disruption of thalamocortical communication as a key component of anesthetic action at the brain systems level. Here, we used the anesthetic agent, propofol, to modulate consciousness and to evaluate differences in the interactions of remote neural networks during altered… Expand
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