The Testing Effect Is Alive and Well with Complex Materials

@article{Karpicke2015TheTE,
  title={The Testing Effect Is Alive and Well with Complex Materials},
  author={Jeffrey D. Karpicke and William R Aue},
  journal={Educational Psychology Review},
  year={2015},
  volume={27},
  pages={317-326}
}
Van Gog and Sweller (2015) claim that there is no testing effect—no benefit of practicing retrieval—for complex materials. We show that this claim is incorrect on several grounds. First, Van Gog and Sweller’s idea of “element interactivity” is not defined in a quantitative, measurable way. As a consequence, the idea is applied inconsistently in their literature review. Second, none of the experiments on retrieval practice with worked-example materials manipulated element interactivity. Third… 
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