The Temporal Expectations of Schooling and Literacy Learning Jermaines Story

Abstract

Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 56 (5) February 2013 doi :10.1002 /JA AL.157 © 2013 International Reading Association (pp. 400– 408) 400 “M right grade is 11th grade.” Unfortunately, as he speaks these words, Jermaine, at age 17, has again been placed in the ei ghth grade and is headed for yet another retention at the end of the school year. Multiple retentions, being overage, not keeping up with the pace of instruction, and failing to meet grade level benchmarks (e.g., failing state ELA tests, low report card grades) have resulted in severe temporal mismatches that accompany being 17 years old and attending middle school. While Jermaine’s is a singular case, his story is not unique among African American male students attending schools in high-poverty communities (Tatum & Muhammad, 2012). In the United States, policies related to grade level retention have a long and controversial history. As Labaree (1984) and Natriello (1996) noted, retention is a serious disruption to children’s educational trajectories. This disruption is particularly problematic and pervasive The Temporal Expectations of Schooling and Literacy Learning

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{ComptonLilly2013TheTE, title={The Temporal Expectations of Schooling and Literacy Learning Jermaines Story}, author={Catherine Compton-Lilly}, year={2013} }