The Teleological Suspension of the Ethical

@article{Mcinerny1957TheTS,
  title={The Teleological Suspension of the Ethical},
  author={Ralph M. Mcinerny},
  journal={The Thomist: A Speculative Quarterly Review},
  year={1957},
  volume={20},
  pages={295 - 310}
}
  • R. Mcinerny
  • Published 15 June 2017
  • Philosophy
  • The Thomist: A Speculative Quarterly Review
A PHILOSOPHER'S prediction about the future success of his book is always interesting; sometimes, however, it can also be misleading. Kierkegaard once said of his book, Fear and Trembling, that it alone would suffice to gain him immortality. This prophecy has been vindicated in that the book is now generally regarded as an important one, but neither its success nor Kierkegaard's forecast is evidence that it is the surest way to get at Kiergaard's own thought. In what follows we will first… 
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References

Fear and Trembling

Writing under the pseudonym of Johannes de silentio, Kierkegaard uses the form of a dialectical lyric to present his conception of faith. Abraham is portrayed as a great man, who chose to sacrifice